Fact Checking Resources

The Internet makes it incredibly easy to spread false or misleading information.  A healthy dose of skepticism is in order regarding anything you may read online.  The International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions recommends these steps for spotting “fake news”:

  • Consider the source.  Click away from the story to investigate the site, its mission and its contact info.
  • Check the author.  Do a quick search on the author.  Are they credible?  Are they real?
  • Check the date.  Reposting old news stories doesn’t mean they’re relevant to current events.
  • Check your biases. Consider if your own beliefs could affect your judgment.
  • Read beyond.  Headlines can be outrageous in an effort to get clicks.  What’s the whole story?
  • Supporting sources?  Click on those links.  Determine if the info given actually supports the story.
  • Is is a joke?  If it is too outlandish, it might be satire.  Research the site and author to be sure.
  • Ask the experts.  Ask a librarian, or consult a fact-checking site, such as one of these:

FactCheck.org
https://www.factcheck.org/
Debunks political claims and viral fake news.

Hoax Slayer
https://www.hoax-slayer.net/
Focuses primarily on the type of hoaxes and misinformation shared on social media, such as Facebook scams, viral privacy policy hoaxes, phishing scams, and social network rumors.

Lead Stories
https://leadstories.com/
Debunks trending hoaxes and false information.

Media Bias/Fact Check
https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/
Check the truthfulness and bias of any news source.

PolitiFact
https://www.politifact.com/
Non-partisan fact-checking site focusing on political claims made in the U.S., including statements from politicians and general political news.

Snopes
https://www.snopes.com/
One of the oldest fact-checking sites, focusing on news stories, urban legends and memes.

TruthOrFiction?
https://www.truthorfiction.com/
Long-running fact-checking site, focusing on “eRumors, fake news, disinformation, warnings, offers, requests for help, myths, hoaxes, virus warnings, and humorous or inspirational stories that are circulated by email”.

 

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